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Friday, 28 November 2014

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Cumbrian car crash artist uses injuries to work with new perspective

For many people a disability which affected their vision and one side of their body would be a massive setback.

Artist Dominic Richardson photo
Dominic Richardson

But not Dominic Richardson. Instead, the 20-year-old has seen his condition as a source of strength as he tries to build a reputation as an artist.

And he’s being championed as an example of why disability should not be a barrier for people to push themselves and pursue their ambitions.

Dominic is currently working towards a Bronze Arts Awards prize. This is a national scheme, run by the Arts Council, aimed at people aged under 25-years-old.

When he was two-years-old he was a passenger in a car which was involved in a serious collision.

This damaged the left side of his brain. One result of this is that the right side of his body does not move at the same pace as his left side.

It has also meant that he is half-sighted in one eye and has tunnel vision in another.

This means his brain does not process the images his eyes receive in the conventional way. However, he has found this helpful in his artistic ambitions.

“I see a lot of different things,” said Dominic, of Alston. “It gives me a unique perspective.”

His work so far has mainly focused on mountain landscapes, many of which he has painted with oils.

“I live in a mountain area so I like doing landscapes.”

As well as painting them, Dominic is also keen on walking up peaks and enjoys going on Wainwright walks.

And he is keen to encourage more people to consider taking up art. He said: “It makes you think and it helps me to relax.”

He has been working at the Whistle Art Stop in Haltwhistle, where he has developed his painting style.

Alison Raimes, the project co-ordinator there, is impressed with his work.

She said: “He has been making really good decisions about what he is doing. He has gone from not having any direction to being focussed on something he really likes.”

Dominic hopes to exhibit his work later this year.

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