How to register and ways to vote in the 2017 General Election

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The Houses of Parliament
The Houses of Parliament

There are just three weeks to go until the snap General Election called by Theresa May takes place.

Parliament has been dissolved paving the way for the national poll.

That means there are no MPs until a new Parliament is elected. Those who held seats are now candidates and are banned from using the title MP and lose all their parliamentary privileges.

New MPs will be elected on June 8 and now is the time to check that you are registered to have your say.

The electoral roll lists the names and addresses of everyone who's registered to vote.

It cannot be viewed online but you can contact your local Electoral Registration Office if you’re not sure whether you’re on the register.

I'm not registered. How do I register?
Go to https://www.gov.uk/register-to-vote
There are a number of questions to must answer and you may need your National Insurance number and your passport if you're a British citizen living abroad. The process takes about five minutes.

What's the deadline for registering?
You must register by midnight on May 22 if you want to vote in the General Election on June 8. You don’t need to register again if you’ve already registered.

Is there any other way to register?
You can also register to vote by post. Go here to download the form: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/voter-registration-forms-paper-versions
The deadline to apply is 5pm on Tuesday, May 23.

I'm registered but how do I actually cast my vote?
You can vote in person at a polling station, by post or get someone else to vote for you (by proxy).

How do I vote at a polling station?
Your local council will send you a poll card before the election which tells you the location of your polling station and when to vote. If you haven’t received a card but think you should, contact your local Electoral Registration Office.
You can still vote if you’ve lost your card.
Polling stations are open from 7am to 10pm at the June 8 general election.
When you arrive at the polling station, officials there will have a copy of the electoral register. Either present them with your polling card or tell them your name and address so that they can check it against the list.
They will give you a ballot paper listing the candidates. Take the paper into a booth and mark your ballot according to the instructions. Doing anything else on the paper may mean your vote is not counted.
If you make a mistake do not put the ballot paper into the ballot box, tell the staff and they can give you a replacement ballot paper. Mark that one up correctly, fold it in half and put it into the ballot box.

I'd prefer to vote by post. How do I do that?
Anyone who is registered can apply for a postal vote. Contact your local Electoral Registration Office which will send out the voting form.
The deadline for applications is 5pm on Tuesday, May 23.

I've received a postal voting statement. Now what?
Make your choice, put the ballot and statement in the envelope provided and post it back.
If you have left it too late to return it by post, you can hand it in to your Electoral Registration Office or take it to your local polling station by 10pm on election day.

Where do I find my local Electoral Registration Office?
Just put your postcode into this website https://www.yourvotematters.co.uk/ to find your office.

Why would I want to vote by proxy?
You can apply for this if you are unable to go to the polling station for reasons including medical, work or you are away on holiday.
There are different forms depending on the reason why you need a proxy.
You can download the right form for you here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/proxy-voting-application-forms
After completing the form, send it back to your local Electoral Registration Office.
The deadline to apply to vote by proxy is 5pm on Wednesday, May 31.

Can anyone be a proxy for me?
No. The person you want to appoint can only be a proxy if they are 18 and registered to vote. A person cannot be a proxy for more than two people at any one election, unless they are a close relative.

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